Guardianships

It is common to hear discussions about a child’s legal guardian, especially in schools as forms need to be signed to give a child permission to attend a field trip or participate in a particular class discussion. While, this is certainly the typical idea surrounding guardianship, there are differing types of guardianships and responsibilities involved.

What is guardianship?

The definition of guardianships states that it is an office or duty of a person who is legally charged with the care and management of another person, or estate, or both. This is definition applies to children and adults alike.

If a parent is unable to care for a child, the court appoints a legal guardian who will be in charge of the child’s welfare. The guardian will have the ability to make all decisions, including medical decisions for the child until he or she turns 18 years old, at which point, he or she will be able to make his or her own decisions.

Guardianship over an adult is generally granted as the adult has a disability (mental or physical) and is unable to care for oneself. A judge will appoint a guardian to care for the adult and make decisions concerning his or her welfare and estate.

Responsibilities

A guardian’s responsibilities will be determined by the court order and can vary depending on the situation, but generally they can include:

  • Medical decisions
  • Paying bills
  • Investing money
  • Buying or selling property
  • Filing taxes each year
  • Physical care of the person

If you wish to become a guardian for a child, loved one, or friend who is unable to care for him or herself, contact the experienced attorneys at Henry & Beaver, LLP. We can help you file the paperwork needed and finalize that process of becoming a guardian. Contact our office today to schedule a consultation. Call our office at 717-274-3644.